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Former French Open champion Schiavone calls it a day

Francesca Schiavone

New York, United States: Former French Open champion Francesca Schiavone announced her retirement, saying there was nothing left to achieve.

The 38-year-old Italian, who defeated Samantha Stosur in the 2010 French Open final and was runner-up to Li Na in Paris the following year, won eight titles in her career.

She was the first Italian woman to win a Grand Slam singles title.

However, the former world No.4 has seen her ranking slump to 454 after last winning a match on the main tour at Wimbledon in 2017.

"When I was 18 years old, I had two dreams. First one was to win Roland Garros, and the second was to become top 10 in the world. I accomplished that," Schiavone announced during a press conference on the sidelines of the ongoing US Open.

"So I'm very, very happy and lucky that, as we say in Italia, 'It's done. This part is done'.

"After 20 years of career and life, I have new dreams."

Schiavone helped Italy to three Fed Cup titles in 2006, 2009 and 2010 and made the quarter-finals at least at all the Slams.

She also won the longest women's match at a Grand Slam when she defeated Svetlana Kuznetsova 6-4, 1-6, 16-14 in the fourth round of the 2011 Australian Open.

(With inputs from Agencies)

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    Story first published: Friday, September 7, 2018, 14:24 [IST]
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